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university where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to
contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress examines where the law is working and the way it was intended. now, the debate we're having right now on this floor is that reexamination. i will just note that i think it's unfortunate that we're doing this at the last second. we have known that this intelligence law is going to expire for years. it was laid out for a multiyear span. and certainly, it is irresponsible for this chamber to be debating this bill under a falsely created pressure that it needs to be done without any amendments in order to match the bill from
? >> guest: there was a common law right in england allowing people to have firearms for self-defense and other purposes issue and that right, common law right, traveled across the ocean with the colonists, and they needed the guns here, whereas in england, mostly, they did not. people soon came to have the facility, and knowledge of firearms, and, of course, as we all know, it produced the results of victory against the most powerful military country in the world at the time in the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and, again, people have hazy views on history, and, you know, it comes from movies or tv a lot of the time. when we had the revolutionary period, what was the role of guns in these militias or requirements that we talked about? >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteer
the connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a representative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the goinsupport othese institutio and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation
about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a major winter storm surged into the midwest and northeast, fouling flight schedules and ruining road conditions on this day after christmas. the huge weather system left a trail of destruction in the gulf coast region and at least six people dead. >> oh, wow, oh jesus, look at that tornado. >> ifill: the calm of christmas night was shattered by tornadoes dropping from
at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a dif
and graduation. it breeds hypocrisy within the school and encourages a scoff law at tuesday among college officials. papers over the prop of why so many latinos and blacks are academically competitive, and it gives states and schools involved in unsavory activities -- like decides which racial minorities will be heard and which ones not -- and how much blood is needed to establish group membership. and i didn't want even mention mismatch. -- i didn't even mention mismatch. [laughter] the mismatch book, in addition to o giving chapter or and verse and ample, irrefutable documentation for why this is a real problem also touches on some of these other problems that i've listed too. you add all those up, okay, and it seems to me that it's a lot stronger than the educational benefits from these random interracial conversations we might be having more of if we use racial preferences in admissions. okay. well, let me wrap up with one sort of happy note, but then one not so happy note. it seems to me -- and i think it ought to seem to the justices -- that one reason why we ought to end this nonse
, national security law on both sides. we are very pleased to announce the book cover has received the 2012 american graphic design award and it is our hope not only will the outside win an award but perhaps the inside. .. critical and important debates. we have one of the senior members working in the back. we want to think jack for being here and all the support that you have given, not only in the book but our committee since you have joined the bar association. appreciated. i speak on behalf of all of our committee. we are pleased to say that we have a number of positive responses. the former national counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to
and that right common law right the colonists the needed the guns here whereas most england they didn't, and so people soon came to have an enormous facility and knowledge of firearms and of course as we all know it proves the result of victory against the most powerful military country in the world with of the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and again i think people get different views in history, and it comes from movies or tv a lot of times. but when we have the revolutionary period what was the role of guns in the militia or these requirements that we talk about? >> guest: george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he growled about a lot of times but also made some remarks that aloud how the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certa
's not done yet, he's okay. and new controversial immigration gun law coming up. can the mexican government have a say how the u.s. deals with illegal immigration? we'll talk to arizona attorney general tom thorn, he weighs in on the ongoing legal battle. >> jamie: plus, a defiant act against president obama's health care law. an update on the u.s. company facing millions of dollars in fines for refusing to comply. >> kelly: and taking a stand in the wake of the tragic school shooting massacre at sandy hook elementary. what some teachers are doing to make their classrooms safer. >> i think that a lot of people have a fear of guns and of what they can do, but i think also that maybe they're not quite educated, that sometimes the only thing we'll talk about is a good guy with a gun. >> and welcome back, everyone, we're following a major challenge to the president's health care law, the arts and crafts chain hobby lobby now saying it will not pro he vied workers with health plans that cover the morning after pill. even though the new health care law requires it. this, after the supreme court
of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking abo
that is operating secret otherwise. >> when congress passes a law, something massive as the 2 2,409 page affordable care tract is the beginning. they are given authority to issue regulation to spell out how the law will be enforced but not before giving the public a chance to weigh in. in 1993, president clinton called executive order to call on agencies to provide minimum of 60 days for public input. three new proposed regulation for obamacare assigned 30 days and will get 24. with the comment period set to end in the week between christmas and new year's. one of the regulation runs more than 400 pages. regulatory experts say it creates nearly impossible task. fully vetting the proposal and submitting in-depth comment by the deadline. >> very few people are aware that the regulatory process allows for public to comment. because of that, a lot of the agencies work in secret. >> americans for limited government sent letters to the administration asking why it's flagrantly ignoring the appropriate comment period. expressing concern about the large number of new regulatory actions that are being under
the way the laws are written in most states, we can't do anything until they actually act. until they've actually committed a crime. >> paul: well, explain that. why to we have to wait if police departments and others know? when you say the law, the way the laws are written, how does that work? or in this case, not work? >> well, these are state laws so they vary from state to state. connecticut, as an example, has among the most stringent, restrictive commitment laws so the only way you can get somebody treated in connecticut is if they are overtly a danger to themselves or others. you can't treat them because they are potentially, because they have exhibited dangerous, dangerous behavior in the past. you have to wait until they actually do something. they also, connecticut's a good example of one of only six states that does not have assistant outpatient treatment. which means you can treat the person living in the community on the condition they can live in the community on condition that they take the medication. connecticut doesn't even have a law like that. >> so, but who makes
of new laws set to hit the books january 1 from new rules on the road to sales tax increases for sm.=i=r? we're live to preview some of the new rules and laws. nannette? californians taxes will go up in just a few days. the income tax will go up for high earners and sales tax going up for everyone. >> shoppers still getting their fill with after christmas sale buzz sales tax will jump another quarter sent bringing state wide tax to 7.5% for four years. california voters okayed the hike to safe schools from deeper cuts. >> i have a 17-year-old daughter and grandchildren going to be in school. whatever we've got to do, we'll dig in deeper to help. >> not everyone is happy with another tax hike. >> in the looking forward to it. this n reason for it to improve things but i never see it going towards that. >> also, help for senior citizens modeled after the amber alert a silver alert for anyone 65 or older who is missing and in great danger because of the medical conditions like alzheimer's. families typically have to wait 24 hours to file a report. >> silver alert law just super sides a
of goes to at what's at the heart of constitutionalism and rule of law, and looking back at the list of things that you listed. in the course of that conversation after a long discussion about the constitutionalism, a center. essentially blackmun turns to moyers and says it's really the preamble that breathes life into the constitution. and i wondered whether that's a point of view that you hold and whether you think it has relevance in the situation we're talking about now. >> , preamble, we the people and united states, et cetera, i used to be able to quote it, i don't think i can now. anyway, it's written down. and the preamble is important saying we the people. but is not the only thing. and i say that because i do think, i had a very interesting conversation in china, i thought. i've gone there twice. the first time was a few years ago, maybe eight or 10, when we went to beijing and then we went to shanghai. and in shanghai we are asked to meet with a group of businessm businessmen, and these businessmen have all been involved in the.com. they lost a lot of money. most of them h
's mentioned, he was a president back then, too, of harvard law review. so he is used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power, the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discover they're not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps the faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to rice a special vision, talent and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's founding. and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding iserrer moanny -- ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october 1912 that reported the event. the papers reported that the distinguished f
we'll soon be governed by sharia law, have no fear. republicans are keeping us safe from something that was never going to happen anyway. that and other lore lights there 2012 in the "sideshow." >>> and finally lly hopes for hopes for the upcoming year, especially from the president. this is "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] feeling like a shadow of your former self? c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance? and your mood is on its way down. you might not just be getting older. you might have a treatable condition called low testosterone or low t. millions of men, forty-five or older, may have low t. so talk to your doctor about low t. hey, michael! [ male announcer ] and step out of the shadows. hi! how are you? be governed by sharia law, have for politics. >>> massachusetts congressman ed markey announced today his candidacy for the united states senate seat held by john kerry who president obama has nominated for secretary of state. markey is a friend and respected gu
for a big tax decrease off of what will then be current law. >> jared, you've got a post -- i just want to go back for a moment. while this ping-pong game is going on in washington, you've got a post on your blog showing the real drag this is having on consumer confidence. so, i mean, what can the president do to protect the economy and try to restore some degree of confidence while these negotiations are going on? >> i think it's a really great, important question. and i think what he has to do is continue to press for a compromise. i've always been struck by how strong the white house is trying to stand on a couple of measures in the compromise to support the 2013 economy. you just mentioned consumer confidence taking a hit from the cliff. but of course there's millions of people who would lose their unemployment benefits. and the white house has been holding fast on a deal that includes temporary jobs measures for 2015. while the white house can push that as hard as it wants, it remains up to the house republicans to take measures that would actually get this -- turn this more into a
or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently given the great honor by his colleagues at the washington college of law to have a lecture named after him. congratulations and thank you for joining us. [applause] so our topic is copyright and the book. very
. in his first national address since signing the constitution into law, morsi called for unity in the aftermath of egypt's divisive referendum. >> because of this result, in order to build the nation, we must all come to gather, which is why dialogue has become a necessity we cannot do without. we all seek within this framework a dialogue of national unity over issues we face in the future. >> president morsi spoke after egypt's upper house of parliament held its first session following the constitution's passage. egyptian opposition leaders have vowed to continue their protest against morsi, calling the constitution process unfair and too skewed toward islam is rules. at a news conference, a spokesperson called for a new demonstration january 25, the second anniversary of the egyptian revolution. >> the front reiterate its rejection of occurred formation of the upper house of parliament and the politics of distributing bribes and the spoils of battle and in sincere dialogue that has now been taking place for some time at the presidency, which is a dialogue through submission t
and the treasury department will take extraordinary measures authorized by law. that will create head room under the debt limit. under normal circumstances circs that amount head room would last two months. but it's difficult to predict how long the money will last. where does the money come from? they will raise retirement fund and there is a slush fund from the exchange raid. >> the bigger problem is getting borrowing under control. it puts the nation at risk immediately for a crit downgrade but it means higher taxes and lower standard of living for future generations. doug? >> doug: the stocks fell. the dow lost 18. s&p 500 gave back two. nasdaq down four. >> doug: president george h.w. bush is at a hospital after having a stubborn fever. >> joe biden on hand to swear in brian shot as the hawaii newest senator. he was selected to fill the vacancy. >>> after the attack on benghazi there was widespread speculation some would lose their job after the security failure but it has nod happened. and john kerry's nomination as secretary of state could hang in the balance. peter doocy has the pieces t
how they work. there is a breath sample taken. law enforcement agencies say check points such as this one help to intercept drunk drivers and take them off of the streets. redwood city police officers have checked 15,000 vehicles so far this holiday period. and made 18 arrests. they support the bill. >> this legislation is being propose today is actually needed to be added as part of the arsenal that we have in detering people that may not just have the will, dedication or moral fort tud to not drive drunk. >> the device costs about $100 but requires ongoing cal braigs to ensure accuracy that can run an additional $50 to $100 every two months. mothers against drunk driving would prefer laws tougher. >> i prefer they're installed on every dui convicted person's car. this is a great stop gach. >> four california counties are in the middle of a pilot project in which those devices are required after the first dui conviction. and is hoping that feed back from that pilot project might provide ammunition it needs for a tougher law. >> writers on edge after another person was pu
but this is not the present i wanted. >> it is always the mother-in-law. come on, is that not too stereo typical. wouldn't you rather have the mother-in-law help you clean up in the clean up or husband or grandfather or a bunch of screnaling kids. >> it is because the mother-in-laws do help. the father-in-laws show up and grab a beer. be honest . sit down on a couch and where's football . johnnie, how are you these past couple of months . they are sitting there with salted nuts and a beer. mother-in-laws come and try to help . they end up having a conflict, right. it is territorial and we have the quish over here and turkey over here and i am doing it my way. am i wrong? >> this is why i don't have a mother-in-law. it is a big problem. i see no need for a mother-in-law at this point. >> i will take a mother-in-law as opposed to a housefull of screaming kids that are being bratty. >> it was cleaned up and watching the kids and my wife was able to focus on doing the meal and a well oiled machine. e-mail us and tweet us as well. >> we are down to the wire. >> final day to run out and get last minute christmas gi
joe leiberman observed on cnn that passing new gun laws won't be easy. >> the strength of the nra that more than half of the abuts in america have guns, own guns, have them in their homes. >> brown: they already may be having affect, gun store owners around the country have reported their stock is flying off the shelves. >> we have christmas business, hunting season business now we have the political business. >> brown: back in newtown the focus remained on coping with a christmas ravaged by grief. local post office received a flood of cards with messages of hope and towns people expect to light hundreds of outdoor candles tonight for the 26 shooting victims. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, egypt's troubled referendum; medical marijuana runs into federal law; special elections coming to the senate; helping haiti's orphans; and hundred years of "poetry" magazine. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the christmas of 2012 began arriving around the world this evening. in bethlehem, manger square was adorned in decorations and lights, a
be governed by sharia law, have no fear. republicans are keeping us safe from something that was never going to happen anyway. that and other low lights there 2012 in the "sideshow." >>> and finally my hopes for the upcoming year, especially from the president. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> massachusetts congressman ed markey announced today his candidacy for the united states senate seat held by john kerry who president obama has nominated for secretary of state. markey is a friend and respected guest on "hardball" and has been in the house since 1976. he's the dean of the massachusetts delegation, and he has the best values of anybody i know in politics. if he gets the democratic nomination for the senate, he could wind up running against scott brown who won the seat in 2010, then lost it last month. the special election is likely to take place this june. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." when john boehner failed to bring his so-called plan "b" to a vote last week because he didn't have enough republican support to pass it, the speaker abdicated his rol
. president vladimir putin has signed a new law banning those adoptions, leaving shocked adults and children wondering what will happen next. here is nbc's kerry sanders. >> reporter: cindy and dennis boyer were weeks away from adopting baby adeline. they met the almost 2-year-old recently as they visited her russian orphanage. but now vladimir putin has signed a law that despite mounds of paperwork and thousands of dollars already spent, all the more than 1,500 adoptions currently under way and any future adoptions are permanently cancelled. >> she's for a home, ready for a family, ready to be loved. >> reporter: why the new adoption law signed so publicly? russian authorities say some of the adopted have been abused or died. one unruly boy was even sent back on a plane alone to russia. also at play here say u.s. experts, retaliation. a visa ban on russian officials accused of human rights violations. >> they're retaliating by holding hostage orphans that otherwise would have homes in the united states. >> reporter: the state department says we deeply regret russia's decision. >> i would as
as well. >> doc, we'll leave it there. thank you. >>> the face facebook face-off, a new law keeping bosses from getting workers' passwords but is it bad for workers? out the for owning a gun. meet the lawmaker trying to make that illegal. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one
. the source noted that the truman era law is so old it would take weeks to implement. even if the old law expires don't expect immediate spike if milk prices. >>> congress is still working to find agreement on the $60.4 billion emergency spending bill for hurricane sandy victims. some conservatives want the government to cut back spending in other areas in exchange for relief money. the new york and the new jersey governors ask for bigger aid packages. >>> the powerful winter storm swept through half of the country and left many in dark. arkansas, 15-inchs of snow caused widespread daniel to power lines and cutting electricity to 200,000 customers. chicago has already reached 500 homicides before the end of this year. the highest level in four years. windy city is desperate to lower its murder rate. correspondent mike tobin looks at one initiative to supporters hope will do just that. [ siren ] >> guy in the middle of the street. looks shot. >> gangland shooting part of every evening in chicago, the gun control debate is ongoing. solution passed by the cook county board of collisioners an
as the waxman hatch or man drug act became law. jack klugman pretty much enrolled orren hatch, not an easy thing to do. jack klugman lived a famous life that's worthy of note. he didn't just save lives on tv, he saved lives. may he rest in peace. we'll see you tomorrow. don't forget to check out my blog on the "washington post." now it's time for lawrence o'donnell. have a great night. >>> ovh, i guess it is showtime. i'm actually trying to finish my christmas shopping. a little bit behind, but, you know, on-line shopping, it will get done. plenty of time to do it during the commercial breaks. let's do this show. with only three business days left until we go off the fiscal curb, says the teleprompter, republicans and democrats are exactly where i always thought they would be. not even close to an agreement. >> christmas is over and most people have the day off. >> we have a dysfunctional congress, but the politicians are still pretending to work. >> people don't like congress. >> it is up to the senate to act. >> harry reid is working on legislation. >> harry reid, the congress and the presiden
vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
. they exchanged vows just after midnight when the new law took effect. >> we finally feel equal and happy to live in maine. >> it's official now. >> after nine years it's all good. >> voters approved it in nova long with voters in washington state and maryland. gay marriages started in washington earlier this month, maryland takes effect tuesday january 1st. >> washington lawmakers are running out of time to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff. senate leaders are working on a last ditch agreement. they hope to vote as soon as tomorrow. both houses will reconvene tomorrow. some republicans suggest racing taxes for those earning at least a million, the president and democrats want increases on making more than $250,000 a year. >> we can't afford a politiclyself inflicted wound to the economy. the economy is growing but keeping that way means the folks you sent to washington have to do their jobs. >> the president said congress must meet the new year's deadline and pass a balanced plan. >> the president's proposal to raise taxes on the top 2% won't even pay one third of the interest that's owed
. it is absolutely against federal law to provide any materially false information relating to the acquisition of firearms. >> the assault rifle and the shotgun that were found with spangler, he committed suicide. >>> this, meanwhile, is the sketch of a suspect in thursday's subway killing in new york city. the woman is said to be heavy set and in her 20s. witnesses say that she pushed 46-year-old sonando sen to his death. security cameras caught the woman fleeing the scene. it is the second subway murder this month in new york city. >>> now to a young woman who was gang-raped on a new delhi bus. she has now died. doctors say she died peacefully at the singapore hospital where she had been treated. authorities plan to add murder charges now against the six suspects arrested in her rain. the charges will be filed next thursday. angry protesters have been demanding justice and more protection for women, and police expect more demonstrations in the days to come. cnn international anchor jim clancy joins me now. jim, new delhi is well-known to be unsafe for women and this is certainly not the firs
you my standard is this -- you can't legislate morality. legislation works on the sane, the law abiding. it doesn't work on criminals -- >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're up for trying it? >> there are monsters out there every day and we need to do something to stop them. >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're worth trying it, correct? >> i want it. that's what i'm proposing. >> let's stipulate you're right. let's say armed guards might work. let's widen the argument a little bit. here is a magazine for ammunition that carries 30 bullets. isn't it possible that if we got rid of these, if we replaced them and said can you only have a magazine that carries five bullets or ten bullets, isn't it just possible we could reduce the carnage in a situation like -- >> i don't believe that's going to make one difference. there are so many ways to evade that. you had that for ten years when dianne feinstein passed that ban in '94, it was on the books. columbine occurred right in the middle of it. it didn't make any difference. i know everyone -- this tow
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